Overview of Bradley Turn Dates and the Bradley Siderograph 3


The video below provides an overview of the Bradley Turn Dates, which are based on the Bradley Siderograph.  This indicator was developed by Donald Bradley in his book called “Stock Market Prediction.”  The video starts by providing some additional context regarding the Bradley Siderograph and its Turn Dates.  It then goes over the Bradley Siderograph itself, including how it is calculated (i.e., the formula to calculate it, etc.).  Finally, the video goes over some of the highlights of the performance of this indicator for 2014.

 

 

Transcript of the Bradley Siderograph Overview Video:

  • Hello and welcome to another new video from bradleysiderograph.com.
  • In this video we’re going to provide an overview of the Bradley Siderograph as well as discuss how to apply it.
  • The Bradley Siderograph was described by Donald Bradley in this book called Stock Market Prediction, which was released the 1940s.
  • The Bradley Siderograph is intended to identify dates when it’s more likely that you might see a shift in market psychology.
  • In the beginning of the book, Donald Bradley talks about how in February of 1948 there was a significant rise in prices that suddenly stopped, and there was nothing that could be pointed to from a macroeconomic perspective as far as why this would have happened.
  • He even talks about an Associated Press article that stated, “The psychological factor is the joker in the economist’s deck of cards. It is the big unknown which most frequently upsets predictions.
  • The idea is that even though the stock market can be analyzed using fundamental analysis and technical analysis and other factors, the psychological factor also plays a big role.
  • Typically investment decisions are made by humans who have emotions, and psychology plays a significant role in those decisions.
  • It is true that in the modern day we have things such as high frequency trading (HFT) that involves more decisions based upon algorithms that are programmed into computers, but still to a large extent the decisions whether to buy or sell securities it is still somewhat judgmental and subject to investor psychology.
  • So the Bradley Siderograph is intended to account for that additional factor – the shifts in market psychology that can take place from time to time.
  • In the book Donald Bradley talks about the factors that underlie the Bradley Siderograph, and he talks about how “There’s an undeniable truth that business fluctuations seem too highly correlative with astrological factors to be the result of pure chance.”
  • And in the book he shows some empirical examples of how certain astrological aspects are associated with either lows or highs in the stock market, and he uses specifically aspects between Venus and Uranus when he does this.
  • So he does provide a statistical basis for his siderograph, and I liked how he was very precise in the way that he calculates it.
  • So let’s talk about how it’s calculated. Before we go on to the next page I’ll just show that he did write some other books, so if you’re interested you can look into these, but I would say that his book Stock Market Prediction is the most well known book.
  • This page right here on the Donald Bradley Siderograph formula, this provides some additional detail into how the formula is calculated, but for now all you need to know is that there are three items that get added together to result in the Bradley Siderograph.
  • There is something called the Long Terms, and the Middle Terms, and Declinations.
  • So these three things added together – Long Terms, Middle Terms, and Declinations – those three added together equal the Bradley Siderograph.
  • So let’s talk about the first two – the Long Terms and Middle Terms.
  • So those are two of the three components and they are basically based on planetary aspects, which can be positive or they can be negative.
  • So here’s the idea – if you look at where the planets are located from the Earth’s perspective, some of them might be approximately 60° apart from each other, and if they are, this is considered a “Sextile,” which is a positive aspect.
  • If they are 120°, so for example Mars and Mercury – this is 120°, that’s 240°, so you could look at it either way, but they are effectively 120° apart from each other. That’s considered a “Trine,” which is a positive aspect.
  • The more positive aspects that you have, the more that you’ll see the Bradley Siderograph increase, and you’ll see a positive increase investor sentiment.
  • If you come over here to the negative aspects, you’ll see that if two planets are 90° apart from each other – that’s considered a “Square,” which is a negative aspect, or if they are 180° apart from each other that’s considered an “Opposition,” which is also a negative aspect.
  • The more that you see negative aspects, the more that the Bradley Siderograph will go down, and you’ll have a decrease in investor sentiment.
  • So here we have the positive aspects and negative aspects, and then down here we have “Conjunctions,” which can be either positive or negative.
  • So if from Earth’s perspective two planets are in a straight line, that’s considered 0°, and that’s a conjunction.
  • So this table down here simply shows when is it a positive and when is it a negative.
  • So what you do is, you basically add together all these positive and negative factors, and if overall the positive factors are overwhelmingly outweighing the negative, you’ll have a higher Bradley Siderograph value, and you’ll see the Bradley Siderograph go up.
  • The only difference between the Middle Terms and Long Terms that we talked about is that the Middle Terms are more for the closer in planets, and they receive a little bit less of a weight, whereas the Long Terms – those are more for the outer planets, such as Jupiter.
  • Jupiter, for example, is a much larger planet, and it takes a lot longer to go around the Sun. So the outer planets – they have a bigger weight.
  • That’s the only difference between the Middle Terms and the Long Terms. But those two of the three components simply relate to planetary aspects as far as – are they overall positive or are they overall negative?
  • Now that we have talked about those two – so I’ll just recap.
  • The Bradley Siderograph is based on upon three things – the Long Terms, the Middle Terms, and the Declinations.
  • So far we have talked about the Middle Terms and Long Terms. Let’s talk about the Declinations. This page provides a description.
  • If you have seen a map of the solar system frequently you’ll see the Sun in the Middle, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto.
  • But even though it might look like the planets are all in a straight line, as the planets go around the Sun, sometimes they can go up and sometimes they can go down.
  • So Venus, instead of just being at the exact same level, it actually goes up a little bit as it goes around the Sun.
  • And if it’s higher up, it has a higher declination, and if it’s lower, it has a lower declination.
  • So this diagram here simply shows that as a planet goes around the Sun, it can be higher or lower
  • So Venus and Earth, they are both going around the Sun, but Venus might be higher sometimes, and then it might be lower sometimes.
  • So if it’s higher, then it has a higher declination, and if it’s lower, it has a lower declination.
  • Higher declinations are associated with it being with there being a higher and a better market psychology, and lower declinations are associated with a lower market psychology.
  • So now that we have covered declinations, you’ve seen all three of the factors that are added together to equal the Bradley Siderograph, which are the Long Terms and Middle Terms, which are based on planetary aspects, as well as Declinations.
  • And it’s the declarations of the planets Venus and Mars, which are the two planets closest to the Earth.
  • So, now that we’ve talked about the formula, as far as how it’s calculated, let’s talk about how it’s applied.
  • So we’ll go over here to the S&P 500 for 2015. You’ll see here that for 2015 the Bradley Siderograph goes up and down.
  • The idea is that we look at turns in the Bradley Siderograph.
  • So previously what people used to do was – they would just judgmentally eyeball it and they would say okay – this looks like a turn, that’s a Turn Date.
  • Some things are clearly a turn. Some things are more judgmental. So for example, it looks like this is a strong turn in the Bradley Siderograph. However, what about this date – is that a Turn? What about that date – is that a turn?  Is that a turn?
  • It’s kind of hard to tell which one should be a turn versus which one should not be a turn.
  • So the Bradley Bars are intended to calculate when a Turn Date actually takes place as compared to having it be judgmental.
  • So for example, this turn was relatively small so it wasn’t classified as a turn, whereas this turn right here was classified to be big enough to be a turn.
  • So it’s important to point out that when you see a turn in the Siderograph – that’s not intended to be a turn in the market that exactly reflects the turn, and here’s what I mean by that.
  • If you see the Bradley Siderograph go up and then down, that does not mean that the market will go up and then go down. That simply means that you might see the market make a turn.
  • And what you see for this turn date back here, you’ll see that the Bradley Siderograph made a turn, and then the market made a turn.
  • And you’ll see here that the Bradley Siderograph made a turn, and you’ll see that the market made a turn.
  • The idea is simply to see when the Bradley Siderograph turns, and you look for a market turn.
  • It’s perfectly normal if the Bradley Siderograph makes a top and the market makes a bottom or vice versa.
  • That’s how you interpret the Bradley Siderograph.
  • In addition to the Siderograph itself, there are also subcomponents that we talked about, such as the Long Terms, the Middle Terms, and the Declinations.
  • So if we go to the S&P 500 for 2014 we can see what the results look like, so let’s just do some interpretation.
  • So when you look at the Bradley Siderograph, some of these dates are turns, but they are relatively small.
  • So, for example, these are technically turns, but they are so tiny that it’s not really worth looking at.
  • The turns that are worth looking at are probably the larger ones.
  • Keep in mind that historically people have said that a larger Bradley Turn Date is not typically associated with a bigger turn, but obviously if a turn is so tiny it wouldn’t necessarily be worth looking at.
  • So if you come down here and look at some of the bigger turns for 2014, you’ll see that the first Turn Date of the year, January 1st, that resulted in the stock market – here we go – I think we have a description down here:
  • The S&P 500’s significant rally from 2013 – it paused. If you look at what happened – this was the Turn Date, and you’ll see that – as the market approached the Turn Date, the market was clearly going up.
  • However, right after the Turn Date, you see that the market pretty much flat lined, and it went sideways.
  • So a turn can either be the market going from up to down, or it could be up to sideways, things like that. It would be a change in the trend of the market.
  • If you look at the other Turn Dates, such as – I would say February 8th is probably a good date to look at.
  • You will see that for February 8th, the stock market was going down pretty significantly, and then right around February 8 (2014), the market started go up again.
  • So that would be an example of how sometimes the Bradley Siderograph makes a top and the market makes a bottom.
  • And you can’t assume that just because the Siderograph makes a top that the stock market will make a top. Sometimes it can be the inverse.
  • So simply look at it as – when there is a turn in the Siderograph – look for a turn in the market.
  • Over here you’ll see that there’s a turn for July 18, and you’ll see that this was associated with a topping pattern in the S&P 500.
  • The next one was October 17, and you’ll see that there is a top in the Siderograph and a bottom in the market.
  • Over here on November 24 of 2014 there’s a bottom in the Siderograph, and you’ll see there is a temporary top in the stock market.
  • And then on the following Turn Date, on December 9th – so if you come down here you’ll see the market was in an increasing period through November 24th until it flat lined from approximately that time until the next turn date on December 9th, and after December 9th it started to go down.
  • And you can see here that – it didn’t just go down a little bit – it went down pretty significantly after the December 9th Turn Date.
  • So at a high level this is how I would describe the way that you interpret the Bradley Siderograph, but I would also like to point out that the underlying elements for the Bradley Siderograph – such as the Long Terms, Middle Terms, and Declinations – they might also be worth looking at.
  • So for example, for 2014 you’ll see that the S&P 500 had a couple of significant Turn Dates in the Long Terms.
  • What you’ll see here is there was is a pretty significant turn in the Long Terms, and at almost the exact same time, there was a pretty significant low in the S&P 500, and then the next turn date that took place in the Long Terms – that was also taking place at approximately the same time that the S&P 500 started to make a significant downturn.
  • If you’re interested in learning more about the Bradley Bars, if you go the Downloads page you can learn more about it, you can see how the Dashboard works, and other information such as that.
  • On the website you’ll see different types of categories. You can see graphs of Bitcoins, various commodities, various international equity indices.
  • There is a section on Financial Astrology, including some of the leading thinkers in the field of Financial Astrology.
  • The Overview section provides an overview of some of the basics that might help you get a sense for how the Bradley Siderograph works and some additional background information.
  • So, I hope this was helpful for you, and if you have any other questions feel free to leave a comment below, and I’ll be happy to answer your questions. Thanks!

 

 


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